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Alain commented on MD Traffic Saving Program App

Somewhere in our minds we have been planted a fear of sharing with others. I think I can imagine the human nature, individualistic and selfish, embracing the idea that there’s no sense in taking a risk sharing the responsibility of someone else riding us if we have our own means of transportation. Not only is lack of confidence in the ability of another driver but also lack of desire because it’s a situation that I can solve by myself without risking. Think the idea is to consolidate this around our place of employment because we spent as average 35 hours a week working and within our employment period of life that’s almost the half of the time we are not sleeping. So, we create friendship in our place of work, you can know that partner very well, you know that he does not use drugs, you may know he is a responsible person, you know that during the trip you are not with a stranger. We could try more this subject in television, we could make more effort in an aggressive telemarketing regarding the advantages of saving our fuel and the depreciation of our vehicle if someone else from work is able to ride us. There’s important references from other states, this is an article from June 2009 Profiles of Innovative Rural Vanpool Programs: “Among the nation’s most innovative vanpool programs are the ones operating in Washington State. This is due, in part, to the enactment of two key pieces of state legislation. In 1991, Washington incorporated the Commute Trip Reduction Law into its Clean Air Act. The law requires each county with a residential population of more than 150,000 and employers with more than 100 employees, as well as each city within those counties containing a major employer with more than 100 employees who must travel during the peak hours of 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m., to follow certain mandates. The guidelines stipulate that employers meeting these criteria must have an employee transportation coordinator on site, survey employees biennially and provide options to reduce single-occupant commuting; these options may include the 132(f) transit benefit and priority parking for vanpoolers and carpoolers. Following are examples of successful vanpool programs serving rural communities or commuters that have incorporated creative approaches to meeting the needs of both providers and participants. Among the elements leading to success are: • developing innovative partnerships; • reaching out to and involving area employers; • understanding the unique needs of individual communities; • obtaining strong political support from local leaders; • emphasizing ease of use for businesses by, for example, working with reliable, experienced third-party operators; • emphasizing ease of use for commuters; and • ensuring access to a guaranteed ride home.” In another hand we have a serious approach to the linking between ride assistance and tax saving chances with WageWorks. They have the Commuter Card. Employees can use this card just like a debit card where they pay for transit and parking. Employees decide how much money to load onto their cards, and that money is available for use on the same day as the payroll cycle. Smart Cards. WageWorks Commuter Account contributions are loaded directly onto transit agency smart cards where available. Buy My Pass. Employees identify which transit agency or vanpool provider to buy from, and the pass is delivered to their home. Pay My Provider. Employees can access their accounts online and fill out a simple form to pay transit agencies or parking providers–no receipts or claims forms required. Pay Me Back. Employees can arrange for commuter account funds to be deposited directly to a checking account or a check to be mailed to reimburse them for expenses they’ve already paid. Let’s exploring..