Join us to participate in the upcoming 2019 City:One Challenge. 

Teach Strategies for Seeking Mobility Information

We will bring knowledge, strategy, and skills to the residents of the impact area through school-age students and their families

Photo of Kelsey Fiedler
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Written by

Our idea

Partner with university programs specializing in teaching non-native English to create a curriculum to be taught within the impact area that teaches students and their families specific strategies for seeking and utilizing information relating to mobility options.

Issues with access to mobility information we intend to address

  • Lack of translated documents, differences in culture, and education frustrate residents of Southwestern Detroit to a point where they no longer want to engage with any mobility options that are not entirely under their control.
  • Example: bus schedules are not easily or readily available in native languages
  • Anxiety caused by not understanding processes or approaches to gathering information generally keeps residents of Southwestern Detroit from seeking information at all.
  • If alternative forms of road usership such as bikes will be incorporated into the impact area, road users will not be familiar with new road markings, new signage, or how to participate in traffic with mixed usership.
  • Sharing information between members of a family is challenging without giving students and parents strategies for solving problems together.
  • Learning to plan a trip using public transportation is easier than ever with planning software and websites, but is a skill that is difficult to understand unless you have the strategy and skills to problem solve at the various hand-off points.


Ideas for topics to be covered in curriculum

Curriculum for students

Strategies for:

  • When you don’t know how to navigate to a place
  • When a family member doesn’t know how to navigate to a place
  • How to teach your family what you’ve learned
  • What to do when your plan requires a credit card
  • How to recognize a signal that indicates there is more information available, and how to find that information
  • How to plan ahead of a trip for not having wifi available


Skills:

  • Bike safety
  • How to use a bike lane
  • How to read a map
  • Reading and planning for public transportation
  • How to read a bus schedule
  • Using translation apps
  • Identifying mobility options using Google Maps


Curriculum for parents

Strategies for:

  • How to approach a question when you don’t know the words in English
  • How to approach a question when the resources aren’t in English
  • How to locate available resources in your native language (NL)
  • What to do when your plan requires a credit card
  • How to recognize a signal that indicates there is more information available, and how to find that information
  • How to plan ahead of a trip for not having wifi available


Skills:

  • How to read a map
  • Using translation apps
  • Identifying mobility options using Google Maps
  • How to drive in traffic with bike lanes


Ideas for implementation

In order to implement this opportunity, we would create an educational opportunity for students and parents to attend together where other Ford initiatives are featured (such as City of Tomorrow or autonomous vehicle implementation). By drawing in students and their families as part of a community activity with food and education opportunities, we will also be able to expose them to the curriculum and give them hands on practice with utilizing the strategies that are taught.

Describe your solution's stage of development

  • Initial Design - you are still exploring the idea and have not tested it with users

Size of your team or organization

  • 2-10

Are you submitting as a student team?

  • No

Are you submitting as a team from the Impact Area?

  • Yes

Funding Request

  • $150,000

1 comment

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of Boratha Tan
Team

Thanks for submitting Kelsey Fiedler . I am part of the City:One facilitation team. I do agree that language barriers do make it more difficult for people to utilize mobility solutions, not to mention the lack of communication and understanding of living in communities. I was wondering if you could describe the budget a bit further. Would it be used to pay employees who will interact with non-English speakers? Would it be put towards educational programs for people to learn about mobility solutions?